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20121214
20121214
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> live from berlin, this is the "journal" on dw. a school shooting in the u.s. state of connecticut leaves dozens dead. we will go live for the latest. >> in germany, investigators say the attempted bombing here this week proves islamist terrorists are at work in the country. >> a german lawmaker plans to send patriot missiles to turkey's border with syria. a shooting at a school in the united states -- 27 people reported dead. most of them children. >> it happened friday morning at an elementary school in the state of connecticut. a parent inside the school at the time reports hearing was sounded like at least 100 rounds being fired. >> this is the scene at sandy hook elementary school. sources saying the suspect is also among the dead and that the body is in a classroom at the school. police say they have recovered two weapons from the suspect. the students kindergarten through fourth graders were all evacuated to a nearby fire station. all schools in the area are under lock down right now. >> law enforcement officials has -- have confirmed the shooter has been foun
authority. u.s. and european scientists offered advice on nuclear safety. richard meserve is former chairman of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission. he says people overseeing the nuclear industry must have technical skills if they are to properly enforce regulations and that those skills must be continuously assesd.d. he f f f f f f should be hired if necessary. andre-claude lacoste is the former head of france's nuclear authority. he say prior to the fukushima accident, the operators only implemented the safety measures that were legally required. he said it's dangerous for plant operators to rely only on state regulations and that they should be encouraged to voluntarily enhance safety. the chairman of the nuclear regulation authority says he's not satisfied with the safety awareness level in japan's nuclear plants. shunichi tanaka says the country must boost those measures by listening to the advice of foreign experts.>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> criticism of this week will be taken as a more than 100,000 celebrated the launch in pyongyang, including officials from the korean workers party and mili
less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: violence continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. syrian state television showed >> woodruff: for more on all of this we turn to vitaly churkin, russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe
and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> the democrats are better regarded in this negotiation than the republicans by a lot. >> warner: plus ray >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. b
the world. thanks for joining us. a sobering reminder of how america's war is still not won. we still do not have a secure afghanistan. today, just hours after i wrapped up an interview with the secretary of defense leon panetta in kandahar at an american base, there was a a brazen attack just outside the bias. the suicide bomber struck, the taliban took responsibility. an american soldier has within killed. two afghan soldiers were killed. americans and afghans were wounded in this attack today. a taliban spokesman not only claimed responsibility for the attack but praised the quote unquote brave taliban fighter who carried it out. also, here in kabul, secretary panetta met with karzai and invited him it meet with president obama next month. the key question for the leaders is where do things now stand and what's next? 11 years, two months and six days. >> we will not tire, we will not faulter, and we will not fail. >> peace and freedom will prevail. >> just one month after 9/11 wbt war against the taliban and al qaeda and afghanistan, it has been steep, more than 2,000 americans dead a
after i visited the base with the u.s. defense secretary, leon panetta, and it's a sad reminder of how safe this country remains after 11 years of war. i'll ask the defense secretary about what's next here, as american troops prepare to leave afghanistan and about the fight for al qaeda. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening. i'm erin burnett live in kabul, afghanistan, tonight for a special edition of "outfront," as we focus on the future of afghanistan. i want to welcome our viewers in the united states tonight, as well as around the world. thanks for joining us. tonight, violence rocks afghanistan. a sobering reminder of how america's longest war is still not won. we still do not have a secure afghanistan. today, just hours after i wrapped up an interview with the secretary of defense, leon panetta, in kandahar at an american base, there was a brazen attack just outside that base. a suicide bomber struck, the taliban had taken responsibility, an american service member has been killed, two afghan civilians were killed. three americans and 18 afghans were wounded in this attack today
too well, so they still had to use the facility but they housed the personnel in two tents out in front. their headquarters is one tent and their dorm is another tent and they welcomed us in there, didn't even think twice. and in the story of what it was like there, for a community of nearly 700,000 people, their complete complement of fire fighters that were on duty, their professional staff, was just over 40. they had 4 pieces of apparatus. the newest of which was over 10 years old. they kept it together literally with duct tape and baling wire and that's what they did every day. and i asked them, how was it after the earthquake. and he said, well, you know, most of them lost their homes too. nobody here was untouched. they all lost family in the rubble, they all lost their homes, but they all came to work. every one of them went out and worked every day until they got as many people recovered as possible and even then most of them just moved into the fire station because they didn't have anywhere else to go. and even then it didn't stop because now you have people l
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)